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Marine ornamental fish for sale

Marine ornamental fish for sale

 

Marine ornamental fish (Amphiprion ocellaris) 1" size is available in CMFRI hatchery, Kochi for sale. Interested parties may contact the Nodal Officer, ICAR Mega Seed Project, CMFRI, Kochi. Contact No. 09895567454.

 

CMFRI achieves success in breeding and seed production of another species of Pompano (Indian Pompano), Trachinotus mookalee at Visakhapatnam.

CMFRI achieves success in breeding and seed production of another species of Pompano (Indian Pompano), Trachinotus mookalee at Visakhapatnam.


Among the many high valued marine tropical finfish that could be farmed in India, the  Indian pompano, Trachinotus mookalee is one of ideal candidate species, mainly due to its good meat quality and high market demand fetching a farmgate price of about Rs. 300 / kg. It is one of the fast growing carangids and occurs along the north-east coast but does not form a major fishery. The species is able to acclimatize and grow well even at a lower salinity of about 15 ppt and hence is suitable for farming in the vast low saline pond waters of our country besides its huge potential for sea cage farming.

At Visakhapatnam Regional Centre of CMFRI, successful broodstock development, and induced spawning of Indian pompano was achieved for the first time in March, 2014. The larval rearing was successfully completed and seed production was achieved. High growth rate coupled with versatile feeding behavior enhances the culture potential. It can also be cultured with shrimps providing added boost to the mariculture of the country. The species produces about one lakh egg per spawning. Efforts are in progress to develop a huge brood bank base to supply the fertilized eggs / one day old larvae for rearing in the hatcheries for the production of seed at their facility, thus facilitating the large scale culture. It is one of the most highly sought after fish with a farm gate price of about Rs. 300 / kg. Pompano is very rich in omega3 fatty acids (oily fish) and is widely regarded for its health benefits. Studies have indicated the occurrence of 16% omega3 fatty acids in similar species of pompano (T. blochii) earlier bred by CMFRI.    

 

   

An Indian pompano brooder

Newly hatched larvae

   
                                                                                  Metamorphosed fry

CMFRI wins Rajarshi Tandon Award for the 6th time

CMFRI wins Rajarshi Tandon Award for the 6th time 

 

Dr. A. Gopalakrishnan, Director, CMFRI received  the Rajarshi Tandon Award introduced by ICAR for the Excellent Official Language activities for the year 2012-2013 on function organized by ICAR in New Delhi on 28.04.2014.

Dr. A. Gopalakrishnan, Director, CMFRI receiving the Award from Dr. S. Ayyappan, Secretary, DARE & Director General, ICAR in the presence of Dr. Gurbachan Singh, Chairman, ASRB and Shri Arvind Kaushal, IAS, Additional Secretary (DARE) and Secretary (ICAR)

Dr. A. Gopalakrishnan, Director CMFRI gifted an ‘Image Pearl Pendant‘ produced at Vizhinjam Centre of CMFRI to Smt. Sheila Dikshit, Hon. Excellency, the Governor of Kerala

Dr A Gopalakrishnan, Director CMFRI gifting an ‘image pearl pendant‘ (produced at Vizhinjam Centre of CMFRI) to Smt. Sheila Dikshit, Hon. Excellency, The Governor of Kerala on 02 May 2014, during the 24th Regional Committee Meeting of ICAR Zone VIII at CTCRI, Trivandrum – in presence of Dr S Ayyappan, Secretary, DARE & Director General, ICAR.

A section of the audience of the function

Harvest of cobia farmed in sea cages by Cobia Fisherman Welfare Association under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

Brief report of the harvest of cobia farmed in sea cages by Cobia Fisherman Welfare Association under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

Cobia Fisherman Welfare Association, a self help group from Rameswaram took up sea cage farming under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI. Ten cages of 6m diameter and 3.5m depth were fabricated and floated by them. All the investments in the fabrication of the cages, the cost of feeds and managing the sea cage farm were borne by the association. A total of 6400 fingerlings of hatchery produced cobia were supplied from Mandapam Regional Centre. The farming was initiated during the middle of November 2013.

On 8th May 2014 the maiden harvest of cobia was conducted. Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS, District Collector, Ramanathapuram flagged of the harvest. About one tonne of fish was harvested on the day. The length of fish harvest ranged from 48 to 62 cm and weight from 1.0 to 2.3 kg. The farm gate price was Rs.270 / kg.

In the conference hall a meeting was also organized. Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS, District Collector, Ramanathapuram was the Chief Guest, Dr.M.Karthikeyan, Deputy Director of Fisheries was the Guest of Honour, Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge & Head, Mariculture Division presided over the function. More than 100 fishermen participated the function.

The harvest will be continued in the coming days. The harvest made by the self help group under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI has generated an interest in the fishermen community of the area to initiate sea cage farming of cobia. The district administration and Tamil Nadu Fisheries Department is planning to take steps for establishing a finfish hatchery in the area to meet the demand of fingerlings. Attractive schemes to motivate the fishermen to take up sea cage farming are also being taken up. It is anticipated that the popularization of sea cage farming in the area can reduce the trawl fishing which is the major factor responsible for crossing the IMBL and the associated issues in the area. 

Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS, Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge and Shri.P.Rajendran, Cobia Association President holding the harvest from the cage at farm site

Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS and Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge handing over the harvested cobia to the Cobia Aquaculture Association

Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS and Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge handing over the harvested cobia to the Cobia Aquaculture Association

Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS lighting the lamp

Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge lighting the lamp

Shri.K.Nanthakumar, IAS giving the Chief Guest address

CMFRI organised a Press Meet for the release of Estimates of Marine Fish Landings in India for 2013

 

Press release on Estimates of Marine Fish Landings in 2013

 

All India marine fish landings

Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), Kochi has estimated the total marine capture fish landings of the Indian coast, barring the island areas of Andaman & Nicobar and Lakshadweep, as 3.78 million tonnes in the year 2013. This is 4% less than the previous year’s (2012) estimate of 3.94 million tonnes, which was an all time high. The landings were contributed by the maritime states West Bengal (2.62 lakh tonnes), Odisha (1.24 lakh tonnes), Andhra Pradesh (2.66 lakh tonnes), Puducherry (0.69 lakh tonnes), Tamil Nadu (6.88 lakh tonnes), Kerala (6.71 lakh tonnes), Karnataka (4.37 lakh tonnes), Goa (1.04 lakh tonnes), Maharashtra (3.64 lakh tonnes), Daman & Diu (0.79 lakh tonnes) and Gujarat (7.17 lakh tonnes).

Important resources contributed to the total landings are oil sardine [6.0 lakh tonnes (15.7%)], Ribbonfishes [2.5 lakh tonnes (6.7%)], Non-penaeid prawns [2.1 lakh tonnes (5.6%)], Indian mackerel [2.0 lakh tonnes (5.3%)], penaeid prawns [2.0 lakh tonnes (5.2%)] and threadfin breams [1.8 lakh tonnes (4.8%)]. Though the Indian oil sardine dominated the marine capture landings with record production in 2012, the reduction is about 1.2 lakh tonnes in 2013. Hilsa landings from West Bengal showed a slight improvement to 41,448 tonnes as against 21,901 tonnes in 2011 and 9,981 tonnes in 2012 but still below the level of 84,000 tonnes in 2010. The landings of Indian mackerel showed slight improvement from 1.7 lakh tonnes in 2012 to 2.0 lakh tonnes still below the 2.8 lakh tonnes mark in 2011.

 

State-wise scenarios

In West Bengal Bombayduck, Hilsa shad, croakers, penaeid and non-penaeid prawns have shown improved landings in comparison to 2012. In Odisha, penaeid prawns, croakers and ribbon fishes have shown a reduction in their landings, whereas Indian mackerel landings were similar to 2012. 

 

Click to view video of Press Meet

 

 

Click to download Brief Summary of

Marine Fish Landings in India - 2013

 

Penaeid prawn, Indian mackerel, ribbon fishes, croakers and Tunnies were the major species landed in Andhra Pradesh and their quantum were relatively same as compared to 2012. Tamil Nadu saw the Oil Sardine emerging as a major species to be landed and the relegation of once dominant silver bellies to lower rungs. Puducherry catch spectrum was dominated by silver bellies and other sardines and their landings were similar in both the years. Penaeid prawns and croakers have shown spurt in landings in 2013 as compared to 2012. Kerala witnessed a fall of its major resource viz. Oil sardine this year. Other major contributors to Kerala were Threadfin breams, cephalopods, stolephorus, Indian mackerel and scads. In Karnataka, Oil sardine which is the major contributor has witnessed a dip in 2013 as compared to the previous year. Indian mackerel and scads have recorded marginal increase in landing as compared to 2012. The other major contributors such as ribbon fishes and cephalopods are stable in their quantum of landings, whereas Threadfin breams have shown a dip after a record landing in 2012. Goa, being a purse seiner dominant state, has been flooded with pelagic catch as expected. Oil sardine is the major contributor to the landings and has not deviated much from 2012 performance. Other resources such as carangids, Indian mackerels, other sardines and tunnies have shown substantial increase over their previous year’s performance. Maharashtra’s spectacle has been dominated by the resurgence story of non-penaeid prawn. Other traditional resources such as Bombayduck, catfishes and ribbon fishes have shown increased landings in comparison to 2012. Gujarat which has shown a slight dip in total landings, has accounted for high contributions from ribbonfishes, non-penaeid prawns, threadfin breams, which have also recorded increased landings. The fishery of Bombayduck witnessed a slightly lesser production and the lucrative croaker fishery also had slipped a bit.

 

Impact of data on stakeholders

The marine fish landing data is an indicative picture of the state wise fish resource availability to cater our domestic and international market. The data availability will help in better management of landed resources. Heavily landed sectors may be better equipped with infrastructure enough to handle the marine fish landings. Marketing channels may be clearly planned according to the inflow and outflow of resources.

Overall production of the landings indicates that there is no immediate threat to the fisheries sector. But state wise data are showing some interesting results. Kerala can be cited as an example where the dip in catch is due to reduction in the most dominant resource of Indian oil sardine. But there is no reduction in the catch per boat involved in fishing. Thus we can infer that the reduction in catch is due to less number of fishing days in the state. Reduction in fishing days are due to inclement weather and rough seas. Thus a reduction in resource in a particular year is not indicating a reason to panic. But we are contemplating a complete usage of all the resources from sea as fish meal plants want raw material for their production. ‘No discard’ does not mean that the resources are safely utilized. Rather there is a concerted search for smaller and juvenile fishes to fulfill the demand of fish meal units. Such indiscriminate use of resources will result in an unsustainable fishing which can lead to collapse of marine fishery resources in the long run. CMFRI already recommended legal mesh sizes for respective fishing gears which can be strictly enforced for reducing fishing of juveniles.

Harvest of sea cage farmed cobia by fishermen self help group of Marakayarpattinam under technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

Brief report of the harvest of sea cage farmed cobia by fishermen self help group of Marakayarpattinam under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

 

Along with the Cobia Fishermen Welfare Association another self help group from Marakayarpattinam also took up sea cage farming under the technical support of Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI. Four cages of 6m diameter and 3.5m depth were fabricated and floated by them. All the investments in the fabrication of the cages, the cost of feeds and managing the sea cage farm were borne by the group. In one cage 400 hatchery produced cobia fingerlings of average length 26 cm and weight 118 gms supplied from Mandapam Regional Centre was stocked on 08.01.2014. In second set of three cages 2000 numbers of hatchery produced cobia fingerlings of average length 19.43 cm and weight 37.7 gms were stocked @ around 630 per cage on 10.02.2014 and the farming is being continued.  

On 22nd May 2014 a partial harvest of cobia which was stocked in the first cage was conducted. The length of fish harvested ranged from 47 to 64 cm (57.2 cm) and weight from 0.845 to 1.968 kg (1.4 kg). The duration of farming was 4.5 months. The farm gate price was Rs.290 / kg.

The harvest will be continued in the coming days. In continuation of the harvest of cobia conducted on 8th May by the Cobia Aquaculture Association the present harvest enhanced the confidence level of the fish farmers that commercially viable farming of cobia in sea cages can be done and marketable size fish production can be achieved within about five months. This is evident from the demand of seed by many self help groups who are ready to invest in the sea cage farming of cobia in the region.

Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge, scientists and technicians handing over the harvested cobia to the fishermen self help group Marakayarpattinam

Harvested sea cage farmed cobia

Weighing of harvested cobia

Harvest of Cage Farmed Cobia and Inauguration of ‘National Training Programme on Marine Ornamental Fish Breeding and Aquarium Management Techniques’ at Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

Harvest of Cage Farmed Cobia and Inauguration of ‘National Training Programme on Marine Ornamental Fish Breeding and Aquarium Management Techniques’ at Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI

 

The harvest of cage farmed cobia as a part of technology demonstration programme was conducted on 28.05.2014 at Mandapam Regional Centre of CMFRI. It was flagged off by Dr.A.Gopalakrishnan, Director, CMFRI in presence of Dr.K.Eswaran, Principal Scientist, CSMCRI, Shri.Abdul Nazar, President, Marakayapattinam panchayat, Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge & Head, Mariculture Division and scientists of Mandapam Regional Centre. The fingerlings produced in the hatchery were stocked in the cages during the month of September 2013. After about 8 months of farming by feeding with trash fishes the harvested fishes ranged in total length from 71 to 102 cm and in weight from 4.1 to 6.9 kg. A partial harvest of 582 kg was made and the harvest is being continued in subsequent days. The farm gate price was Rs.310 per kg.

A marine reef aquarium and a marine finfish and shellfish seed production centre were also inaugurated on the same day by Dr.A.Gopalakrishnan, Director, CMFRI in presence of Dr.K.Eswaran, Principal Scientist, CSMCRI, Shri.Abdul Nazar, President, Marakayapattinam panchayat, Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge & Head, Mariculture Division and scientists of Mandapam Regional Centre.

Subsequently a 10 days National Training Programme on ‘Marine Ornamental Fish Breeding and Aquarium Management Techniques’ was inaugurated by Dr.A.Gopalakrishnan, Director, CMFRI. Initially Dr.G.Gopakumar, Scientist-in-Charge & Head, Mariculture Division gave outline about the training programme. Dr.K.Eswaran, Principal Scientist, CSMCRI and Shri.Abdul Nazar, President, Marakayapattinam panchayat gave felicitation addresses.

Summer school on Technological Advancements in Seed Production of Marine Finfish and Shellfish

Training porgramme on “Isolation, Identification of micro algae and live feeds for aquaculture"

 

 

Training porgramme on “Isolation, Identification of micro algae and live feeds for aquaculture"

 

Topics covered :

  • Isolation and Identification of micro-algae
  • Purification techniques
  • Stock cultures and mass culture techniques
  • Uses of micro algae
  • Culture of live feeds like copepods and artemia

 

Date: 22 -26 July 2014
Venue : CMFRI, Kochi

Co-ordinator: Dr. Shoji Joseph

Contact  No : +91-484- 2394867 Extn: 453
Mob:+91-9495336852
Fax: +91-484-2391407

Mail to : sjvben@yahoo.com

Apply before 15-07-2014

MoU signed between CMFRI and NIO for collaborative research programme on Fisheries and Oceanography

MoU between CMFRI-NIO for collaborative research programme on Fisheries and Oceanography

On 7th July 2014, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed by Dr.A.Gopalakrishnan, Director, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), Kochi and Dr.S.W.Naqwi, Director, National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa for undertaking collaborative research program on “Mud bank” a unique phenomenon observed along southwest coast during monsoon. Mud banks are clam areas when wave action is practically absent when rest of the coastal waters is turbulent with very high waves.  Fishermen consider “Mud banks” as blessings since they can operate country crafts in these calm waters and sustain their livelihood. Dr V. Kripa will be the leader of the project for the CMFRI component.

Reports on mud banks date back to early 18th century and detailed studies were undertaken in nineteen seventies by CMFRI under the leadership of Dr.E.G.Silas, Former Director, CMFRI.  Subsequent to this, targeted studies by individual researchers were conducted on mud banks. Even today, the mystery regarding formation of mud banks remains largely unresolved. During some years the mud banks remain for a long period whereas they form and dissipate very fast in other years. Now to understand the science behind the formation of mud banks and how it affects the resources, a multidisciplinary approach is planned by CMFRI and NIO. The physical and chemical oceanographic aspects will be investigated in detail by NIO while CMFRI will explore the biological aspects.

The signing of MoU was in CMFRI where scientists from both the Institutes participated. Dr Kripa welcomed the delegates from NIO and CMFRI. Dr. S. A. H. Abidi, former Member, ASRB gave a special address on the occasion. Felicitations were offered by chief scientists of NIO Dr. S. Prasnnakumar,  Dr. P.S.Rao, Dr.N.Ramaiah and Dr. P. S. Parameswaran, SIC, RC, Kochi. Dr. K. S. Mohamed and Dr.P.U.Zacharia, Heads of Divisions from CMFRI also welcomed the collaboration and spoke on the occasion. Both the Directors mutually agreed to work jointly for understanding the ocean and its resources and congratulated the efforts made by the scientists who have already started working towards achievement this goal.

The CMFRI, Research Vessel Silver Pompano will be used for the detailed studies of mud banks of Alapuzha, in central Kerala.

Shri. K.G. Jayaprasad, SSS, CMFRI, Kochi won medal in International Cycling Competition

 

Shri. K.G. Jayaprasad, SSS, CMFRI, Kochi won medal in International Cycling Competition

 

Shri. K.G. Jayaprasad, SSS, CMFRI, Kochi participated in the cycling competition conducted by Audax Club Parisien (France) through Brever De Randonneus Mondiax, an international cycling organization, in association with Cochin Bikers Club, and won medal vide Rider No. COK074 (Brovet No. 394697). The distance covered was 200 km, staring from Cochin Bikers Club, Palarivattom, Kochi via Muvattupuzha, Malayattoor, Manjapra, Plantation Road, Athirappilly, Chalakkudi, Angamaly, Mattoor and back to Kochi.

 

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